Synthetics Breakthrough to Increase Biofuel Production by 50 per cent Oct 18 2013

Biofuels are hardly worth making these days—but a new breakthrough in synthetics promises to increase biofuels production by 50%.

Researchers at the University of California (UCLA) have created a new synthetic metabolic pathway for breaking down glucose that they say could lead to a 50% percent increase in the production of bio-fuels.

The result of the research could make it cheaper to produce biofuels from a variety of sources, especially biomass such as wood chips and grass.

Despite the government’s ethanol mandate, which sets a high volume on the amount of biofuel that must be blended with gasoline, US biofuel producers are still in desperate need of more help, which can only be truly fruitful with scientific advancement.

The new pathway, called non-oxidative glycolysis (NOG), intends to replace the natural metabolic pathway known as glycolysis.

Glycolysis is currently used in bio-refineries to convert sugars derived from plant biomass into biofuels, but the loss of two carbon atoms for every six that are input is seen as a major gap in the efficiency of the process. . . .

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